wicklowwalks

A pictorial guide to walks  in the beautiful Irish county of Wicklow
And a pleasant chat along the way

Around Powerscourt Waterfall

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This strenuous walk is about 4 hours in duration. The walk will take you up towards Djouce Mountain in Djouce Woods then along the Wicklow Way, crossing over the Darkle River at the head of the waterfall and down into Crone Woods. The route then leaves the Crone Woods and goes down into the Powerscourt (Waterfall) Estate and the foot of the waterfall and finally up again into Djouce Woods. Unfortunately the upper car-park at Djouce Woods is closed, I found enough room to park beside/on the public road.

Map of djouce and crone woods

                                                                                                       
Up through Djouce Woods
djouce woods djouce woods

The route starts at the upper car-park ( now closed ) along the Paddock Pounds and then crossing over to the far end and taking the forest road up to the Wicklow Way.

djouce woods djouce woods
                                       
Along the Wicklow Way
Wicklow Way , Djouce Mountain

The route turns right after reaching the upland and follows the Wicklow Way down to the Dargle River and up again before taking a right turn into Crone Woods.

Wicklow Way, Dargle River
                                 
Wicklow Way Wicklow Way
   
Wicklow Way
                                                                                                                                                 

In the grandeur of our surroundings please consider the following anonymous piece.

The Incomparable Christ !

More than nineteen hundred years ago, there was a Man born contrary to the laws of life. This Man lived in poverty and was reared in obscurity. He did not travel extensively. Only once did He cross the boundary of the country in which He lived; that was during His exile in childhood.
He possessed neither wealth nor influence. His relatives were inconspicuous and had neither training nor formal education.
In infancy He startled a king; in childhood He puzzled doctors; in manhood He ruled the course of nature, walked upon the waves as pavement, and hushed the sea to sleep.
He healed the multitudes without medicine and made no charge for His service.
He never wrote a book, and yet perhaps all the libraries of the world could not hold the books that have been written about Him.
He never wrote a song, and yet He has furnished the theme for more songs than all the songwriters combined.
He never founded a college, but all the schools put together cannot boast of having as many students.
He never marshalled an army, nor drafted a soldier, nor fired a gun; and yet no leader ever had more volunteers who have, under His orders, made more rebels stack arms and surrender without a shot fired.
He never practiced psychiatry, and yet He has healed more broken hearts than all the doctors far and near.
Once each week multitudes congregate at worshipping assemblies to pay homage and respect to Him.
The names of the past, proud statesmen of Greece and Rome have come and gone. The names of the past scientists, philosophers, and theologians have come and gone. But the name of this Man multiplies more and more. Though time has spread nineteen hundred years between the people of this generation and the mockers at His crucifixion, He still lives. His enemies could not destroy Him, and the grave could not hold Him.
He stands forth upon the highest pinnacle of heavenly glory, proclaimed of God, acknowledged by angels, adored by saints, and feared by devils, as the risen, personal Christ, our Lord and Saviour.
We are either going to be forever with Him, or forever without Him. It was the incomparable Christ who said:
“Come to Me, all you who are weary and
burdened, and I will give you rest.”
(The Gospel of Matthew chapter 11verse 28)
“I am the way and the truth and the life. No one
comes to the Father except through Me.”
(The Gospel of John chapter 14verse 6)



                                                                                                                       

Following the Wicklow Way the route descends into the Crone Woods passing spectacular views of the waterfall and Deerpark.

Wicklow Way Wicklow Way
                                                                   
Into Powerscourt Estate
                                                                                               
Wicklow Way Powerscourt Waterfall Estate

The Wicklow Way turns away from the direction of the waterfall and the route leaves the Wicklow Way and takes a forest road on the right. This forest road ends at a deer proof gate and fence. There is a track running parallel to the forest road and crossing rough ground at right angle to the forest road (right side of the gate) the track can be found. The route is downhill along this track. This track is blocked in places but keep going down hill until you pick up another track and finally reach a tarmac road at the bottom of the Deer Park.



Powerscourt Waterfall Estate

Turning right at this road the route will take you to the waterfall, toilets, a snack shop and a bridge over the river. I have been informed that it is acceptable to enter Deer Park from the woods but just in case it was a private opinion rather then Estate policy I will not say who told me.

Powerscourt Waterfall Estate
                                               
Up Into Djouce Woods
Powerscourt Waterfall Estate Powerscourt Waterfall Estate

The route crosses over the river and follows the lower track along the side of the river and then crosses over a small stream and enters Djouce Woods through a gap in the deer fence.

Djouce Woods

The route is uphill in the Djouce Woods along a old horse carriage road that zig - zags to the Paddock Pounds. and then to the public road.

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